Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘chicken’

A few years ago I met the most extraordinary Lebanese woman named Diana.  She was living with my in-laws while completing her Master’s Degree in Counseling.  I think she may have secretly been an angel sent straight from heaven; she taught me about Lebanese food and fed it to us in copious amounts, and she consoled our family as we helplessly waited day after day at the hospital, my father-in-law dealing with a devastating illness that nearly claimed his life.   

I relished the time we spent chatting on the sofa for so many reasons, but I found it especially interesting to discuss our different worldviews and the cultural nuances that shaped us both as young, independent, determined women.  For instance, when I hear a rumble of thunder, I think of the spectacular storms that I grew up with in Texas.  Diana wonders where the bombs are falling.  

Apparently Diana cast a spell on us with those meals, because I have been intensely passionate about Lebanese food ever since (and when I say “intensely passionate,” I really mean crazed).  She sent me home with precious little baggies of za’atar, sumac, seven spice and white pepper, but I had high hopes of discovering the exact components of seven spice to simply mix the spices myself.  No such luck.  Between my English and Diana’s mom’s Arabic, we couldn’t get it completely figured out.  Internet research will lead you down varying paths, but the mixture can vary from family to family.  I definitely know that clove, cinnamon, allspice, pepper and nutmeg are the heavy hitters; it gets tricky with the remaining two spices.  Some say ginger and fenugreek, some say caraway and cumin…  I can’t stand to waste a meal not getting it exactly right, so I buy my seven spice from the patient and diligent owner of Leon’s International Bakery and allow it to remain exotic and mysterious. 

The first time I visited Leon’s I arrived armed with my tiny ziploc baggies of Diana’s spices.  I believe I made a memorable impression that day, and not just because I was caught dancing in the aisle to the Arabic music that was playing.  I called the gracious owner of Leon’s over to his spice rack and I held open each little baggie, focusing especially on the seven spice.  “Please smell this,” I said.  He raised an eyebrow and sniffed.  “Please tell me if you are selling exactly this mixture here at your store,” I said.  He assured me that it was likely to be very close.  “This is from Lebanon,” I said.  He nodded.  “I’m very intent on getting this exact mixture because I want to replicate certain dishes – please do sniff again – my bag first and then your spice mixture.”  That blessed man sniffed again, offering his sincere assurance that I would be satisfied.  As I said, “passionately intense.” 

I made my purchases that day, and needless to say, his mixture is the best I’ve tried yet.   During my last visit I was explaining this to him – that I have tried blends from other reputable providers in many U.S. cities, and that his is the absolute best.  “Because it is the original,” he says.  I continued on in my monologue, assuring him that his offerings are unmatched in taste and aroma.  This must qualify me as an expert, because he turned and asked me if I was originally from Lebanon. 

There are so many Lebanese dishes that we eat with great frequency in our home, and I want to share all of them with you.  My favorite dishes call for generous amounts of lemon and garlic and olive oil, astringent sumac for a tangy zip and lots of seven spice for depth and deliciousness.  However, they deserve to be discussed one at a time, so I’m starting with the first dish that Diana served to us – chicken and potatoes.  I haven’t found this exact recipe in the one hundred or so Lebanese cookbooks that I’ve looked through, so I assume that the combo of chicken and potatoes is one that Diana’s mom prefers.  I like that. 

Diana’s way is good enough to have Jon and I pine after it like forlorn lovers, but I recently applied that high heat, miraculous roast chicken method to the recipe, and our lives changed forever.  This post is already exceedingly long, so I’ll spare the finer points of why cooking chicken this way in the oven is really the only way to do it.  You can check the details out in chapter one and chapter two of the fabulous roast chicken saga. 

Let me instead tell you about how the potatoes and will soak up this heady blend of spices, and will cook to perfection doused in lemon and garlic.  The chicken will be succulent and juicy and flavorful and silky and fabulous.  The olive oil and spices and lemon and garlic will meld together in the baking dish to form the most glorious sauce that has ever graced a silly little potato or a humble piece of chicken.  Your house will smell glorious.  Your life will change.  You may cry tears of joy.  And while you belly dance your way through the kitchen to drink the remaining olive oil directly from the baking dish, you too can be transformed into an honorary Phoenician, changed forever by Diana’s chicken and potatoes. 

chicken and potatoes – serves four or two really hungry and over indulgent people

  • one bone in skin on chicken cut into pieces, or two bone in skin on breasts, or several bone in skin on thighs – decide based on the number of people that you are serving
  • three to six russet potatoes, peeled and cut into half inch medallions
  • four or five cloves of garlic, grated with a microplane zester or smashed to a paste in a mortar and pestle
  • two or more lemons, juiced
  • two heaping tbsps of Lebanese seven spice
  • one heaping tbsp of allspice
  • one heaping tbsp of cinnamon
  • 1/2 heaping tsp of ground white pepper
  • kosher salt to taste, about one tsp
  • a generous amount of olive oil
  1. mix all of the spices and salt together in a small bowl, and add enough olive oil so that the spices and oil together form a thick, soupy mix – you don’t really want a paste, but you also don’t want a soup – you want a well stirred homogenous mixture
  2. grate the peeled garlic into another small bowl, and juice the lemons into the same bowl – whisk together
  3. put your chicken in a large glass baking dish, cover the chicken with the spice and oil mixture – be sure and generously coat the chicken, making sure to put plenty of the mix under the skin – then, carefully spoon a small amount of the lemon and garlic mixture UNDER the chicken skin, taking care to keep any of the lemon and garlic mixture from getting on the top of the chicken skin
  4. place the chicken on the very top shelf of a five hundred degree oven, and bake for fifteen minutes
  5. meanwhile, peel the potatoes and cut them into half inch medallions
  6. cover the potatoes with cold water in a saucepan and bring to a boil – simmer for ten minutes and then drain
  7. when the chicken has baked for fifteen minutes, pull the pan out of the oven and add the potatoes, covering them generously with the remaining oil and spice mixture – give the entire pan a few extra glugs of olive oil – be generous
  8. bake the chicken and potatoes for an additional fifteen minutes
  9. pull the chicken and potatoes out and pour over the lemon and garlic mixture, and bake for five more minutes
  10. remove from the oven and serve, with the olive oil sauce poured over the chicken and potatoes

Read Full Post »

summer on a plate

summer on a plate

Summer is almost over, my friends.  It’s going to be hard for me to say goodbye to the berries, the peaches, the summer squash – all of the beautiful produce that is overflowing at the market right now.  I’m clinging to this food season with every meal, and tonight was quintessential summer. 

Roasted baby tomatoes and a fresh and lively vinaigrette go perfectly with simple pan sauteed chicken; shallots and the sweetness of the tomatoes add a mellow balance to the assertive flavors of dill, mustard and champagne vinegar.    We ate this with fresh yellow corn on the cob, slathered in butter and seasoned simply with salt and pepper.  The corn is really so delicious that it doesn’t need anything, but I look for any excuse to eat a little melted butter. 

Even though it’s been raining for at least five days straight in Atlanta, I felt so summery while we ate dinner… I gnawed (literally) on my tender little corn and imagined that I was sitting at a picnic table somewhere outside near some tall, climbing trees, a canopy of twilight stars over my head, warm summer breeze on my face and a show of fireflies twinkling through the trees… I could almost smell freshly mown grass and honeysuckle… Yes – buttery, perfectly in-season corn can cause me to wax poetic; I might have even burst out with a rendition of Billie Holiday’s Summertime if a pitcher of homemade lemonade had graced our table.  Jon broke up my mental reverie by announcing that our dinner made him nostalgic for the summers of his childhood when he and his family would pick corn from a neighbor’s field.  I love food that is so firmly planted in a season or a memory that each bite, each taste, transports you to a cherished place or time. 

I should also mention that his warm and fuzzy recollection was followed by a comment that corn on the cob is really better eaten at home than in public.  I chose not to ask about the inspiration for this proclamation, but instead to wipe the butter and corn from my chin and cheeks. 

This was ready and on the table in less than thirty minutes; it would be a tragedy for others that I know and love to not share in the final stages of summertime deliciousness by eating this fantastic meal.  The original recipe came from Gourmet and can be found here; the recipe below is with my modifications. 

As for my bizarre three week absence from the blog, I have no explanation.  All I can say is that I’m back!  Thanks to those of you who encouraged me to get writing again.

chicken paillards with tangy tomato-dill relish and tender buttered corn

  • four skinless, boneless chicken breast halves
  • 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 1/4 cup chopped dill
  • 3 tbsp finely chopped shallot
  • 1 tbsp grainy mustard
  • 1 tbsp champagne or white wine vinegar (or red wine, if you don’t have either of those two)
  • 1 pint of cherry tomatoes, halved (I like to scoop out the seeds with my finger)
  • fresh corn on the cob, shucked
  • butter, salt and pepper to taste
  1. preheat oven to 425 degrees and set a large pot of water to boil
  2. pound the chicken breasts to 1/4 of an inch thickness between two sheets of plastic wrap with a meat mallet or rolling pin
  3. whisk together oil, dill, shallot, mustard and vinegar in a large bowl
  4. toss the halved tomatoes with a few spoonfuls of the vinaigrette mixture and roast in the oven for seven to ten minutes
  5. meanwhile, season the chicken breasts with a little kosher salt and pepper and spoon some of the vinaigrette over one side of each breast
  6. add chicken breasts to a skillet heated over medium heat, vinaigrette side down; spoon more vinaigrette over the unseasoned sides of the chicken in the pan; cook chicken three to four minutes per side, adding the remaining vinaigrette at the end of cooking
  7. while chicken is cooking, add corn to boiling water and cook for five to six minutes
  8. serve the chicken with the roasted tomatoes scattered on top – buttery corn on the side – prepare to reminisce in happiness

This recipe serves four, but I made the full amount of vinaigrette for our two pieces of chicken because I like things saucy and extra flavorful; if serving four you may want to make some extra vinaigrette.

I generally use this method for cooking chicken; splitting a chicken breast between two people is actually an appropriate portion size, saving money and extra calories.  Pounding the chicken flat allows for quicker, more even cooking and a seemingly larger size.  This is a great, everyday method.

 

Read Full Post »

moroccan-stewWow.  I have been away for a while.  I feel distant from my little blog space and from my kitchen.  We’ve been slowly reconnecting since my time in Orange County; I’ve been sleepwalking through my house the last few days and enjoying my own food in a dream-like state.  Ahhhhh…

Anyway, I’m back and I want to share this easy and fabulous Moroccan stew.  I made it just before I left for my event in So Cal; I felt so comforted and joyful and delightfully global while eating it – I was transported from my deadlines and pile of work to food fantasy land.  It is the FIRST thing I made when I got home.  It is warm and beautifully spiced and fragrant and very healthy and extremely delicious.  How can something be comforting and sensual and exotic all at once?  This is how.  This dish.  I know I get very intense and dramatic about food, but please, make this and go there with me.  It is so, so good. 

I originally came across the inspiration for this dish on Gourmet’s website, but I’ve changed it so much that I’m just warm-spices giving you my version below.  The dish departs from the traditional couscous and is made with quinoa, which is actually an ancient Incan grain and is extremely nutritious.  I love nutty and tender quinoa, which is what originally caught my eye; the warm addition of spices is what inspired me to try it immediately.  You can be very flexible with this – adjusting, eliminating or adding spices to your liking; all of my measurements are estimates since I tend to just spoon and pinch into the pot.  If you want to go vegetarian, add chick peas instead of chicken.  The first time I made it without the dried prunes and it was savory and spicy tomato-y goodness.  The second time I added the prunes which gave the dish a sweeter dimension.  I liked both ways so much that I think I’ll keep switching it up.  This could serve two to four depending on the amount of quinoa you prepare – I made enough “stew” for four and quinoa for two – we just ate extra veggies and sauce.

Soft and nutty quinoa, toasted almonds, tender chicken, sweet carrots and earthy turnips, warmly spiced sauce, bright and green little onions or parsley – all so tasty and so good for you, too!  I’m in love with this dish – I will make this over and over again.

Sit down at the table and inhale the lovely fragrance of the spices – take time and enjoy the flavor in every bite – imagine that you are wandering the narrow aisles of a souk in Morocco with the intense aromas of steaming tagines, the colors of the market and the sounds of music and humanity joyfully confronting your senses.

warm moroccan stew

  • 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • a handful of slivered almonds, toasted
  • one red onion, halved and thinly sliced
  • one tbsp of tomato paste
  • one heaping tsp of paprika
  • one half to one tsp of cumin
  • half tsp of dried ginger
  • one half to one tsp of cinnamon
  • one half to one tsp of corriander
  • pinch of clove
  • pinch of red pepper flakes (use aleppo if you have it)
  • two cups of low sodium chicken broth
  • one skinless, boneless chicken breast or a half pound of skinless boneless chicken thighs, cut into one inch cubes
  • two to three carrots, sliced about a quarter of an inch thick on the diagonal
  • one large turnip, peeled and cut into eight wedges
  • two thirds of a cup of pitted, dried prunes, halved
  • salt and pepper, to taste
  • quinoa (or other grains such as bulghur or rice if you don’t have quinoa – but I suggest you get some and keep it as a pantry staple)
  • a couple of fresh green onions or fresh flat leaved parsley for garnish
  1. heat oven to 350 degrees and toast almonds for about 5 minutes or until fragrant – remove from oven and set aside
  2. meanwhile, prepare quinoa or grains according to package instructions, typically two cups of water to one cup of grains, simmered or steamed for added fluffiness
  3. heat olive oil in a larger saucepan over medium high heat, add onions and saute with some salt and pepper until soft, about six to eight minutes
  4. add the tomato paste and cook for about one minute more, stirring well to combine
  5. add your spices and cook for about one minute more, adding a little chicken broth if things are getting too brown
  6. add the veggies, chicken, prunes (if using) and broth and cook, covered for about 15 to 20 minutes
  7. ladle the stew over the quinoa and top with the toasted almonds and fresh green onions or parsley – serve with some harissa paste if you want a lot of heat and spice

I always freeze tablespoons of tomato paste in separate bags so that the entire can doesn’t go to waste after one use

Read Full Post »

sweet and spicy toasty chicken with tender onions

sweet and spicy toasty chicken with tender onions

Remember how I mentioned that the secret to perfectly roasted chicken is the very top rack of the oven at 500 degrees, lots of olive oil and skin-on, bone-in chicken?  If you don’t remember, now you know.  Thank you, Gourmet, for sharing this extraordinary knowledge.  This sweet and spicy and roasty toasty recipe is the first way that I had this magical chicken – so pleasing and delicious. 

It’s a perfect weeknight dinner because it is ridiculously easy to prepare.  It’s also a very economical way to feed quite a few people.  The simple combination of paprika, cayenne and cinnamon ends up tasting surprising and complex – the onions roast to sublime tenderness and sweetness.  I like to roast a few vegetables in a different dish next door to the chicken in the oven.  Sometimes squash and zucchini, sometimes cauliflower; either way I give the veggies a generous dose of lemon juice, garlic, olive oil, salt and pepper and a little parmesan.  Gourmet recommends green beans with shallots and cashews – also magnificent. Just make sure you put your veggies in for about 25 minutes instead of the 35 that the chicken needs. 

I can never actually follow the rules for anything, and I don’t always have the patience to measure, so I say you get to adjust the amount of spices to your taste.  The recipe below is just a guideline.  I love lots of paprika, lots of cinnamon and a little less cayenne.  I also add a dash of smoked paprika.  You can use a whole, cut up chicken for a full table; I use a couple of skin-on, bone-in breasts for two or three.  Sweet onions or regular – either will be very tasty.

Once again we have an amazing dish that tastes fabulous, cooks all at once in the oven, makes your house smell fantastic and is easy to clean up.  Yes, please.  Stay tuned for future editions of “fabulous roasted chicken” – I’m thinking szechwan peppercorns or chile and lime… adobo spices or something sweet and Moroccan…

delicious paprika and spiced roast chicken with sweet onions

inspired by Gourmet magazine – serves 4 to 6

  • 1/4 cup olive oil, plus more for drizzling
  • 1 1/2 tbsp paprika
  • 1 1/2 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/2 tsp cayenne (or more if you like it spicy)
  • 1 whole chicken, cut into serving pieces (I just use a few breasts)
  • 2 to 3 vidalia onions or yellow spanish onions, quartered
  1. mix the olive oil with the spices, plus about 1 1/2 tsp of kosher salt and a little black pepper in a bowl – the mixture should be a little runny but well incorporated
  2. lay chicken and quartered onions in a large baking dish and generously rub spice and oil mixture all over the chicken, taking care to get plenty under the skin, as well as generously rubbing and tossing the onions in oil and spice mixture (everything should be well seasoned – not dry)
  3. drizzle with oil if necessary, add an extra pinch of salt over the dish, and bake, skin side up for 30-35 minutes on the very top rack of the oven at 500 degrees
  4. serve and sing praises for amazing food that is easy to prepare, warms the soul and fills the belly

Serve with all of the pan juices poured over the chicken and onions for extra flavor.

Be sure and roast with the skin on, even if you don’t plan to eat it.  This will help to keep the chicken moist and flavorful and cannot be omitted. 

Read Full Post »

lemony herby honest chicken - eat immediately

lemony herby honest chicken - eat immediately

We ate some wonderful roasted chicken breast tonight.  I sit and write this full and content – pleased with the unique satisfaction that comes from a full belly of something comforting and savory.

I have been traveling so much lately and have been yearning for something simple and delicious, cooked in my own kitchen.  Sunday is market day, and I wandered the crowded aisles thrilled to be shopping for a week’s worth of meals.  I love the energy of the market; today the produce was as abundant as the shoppers, diverse and overflowing.  I passed some beautiful parsnips and springy baby vidalias and the thought of a simple roasted chicken came to mind – one dish in the oven emanating lovely fragrance throughout my home – minimal dishes – snuggly time with my husband and my Bill Bryson book – yes, please. 

This impromptu, market-inspired dish is so simple it’s ridiculous.  Chicken, parsnips, carrots, baby vidalias – all very rustic and honest ingredients.  An elegant little sauce elevates the beautiful flavors of the vegetables with just enough sweet, tangy, herby goodness to keep things interesting.  The chicken will be perfect; juicy, succulent and tender with crispy skin.  A hit of balsamic vinegar in the last ten minutes of cooking adds a subtle sweetness and extra layer of flavor that takes this humble dish to the next level. 

It may seem unusual to cook everything on the very top shelf of the oven at such a high temperature – don’t deviate!  This and a generous amount of olive oil is the secret to delicious oven-roasted chicken breast.  (Stay tuned for chapter two of fabulous roasted chicken breast.)  I prepared just one skin on, bone in chicken breast to split between two hungry people, but you could go for as many as you like.  The recipe below is for one chicken breast – adjust the amount of chicken and veggies according to your taste and serving size. 

fabulous roasted chicken breast and honest veggies with a lemony, herby sauce

  • bone in, skin on chicken breast
  • four medium parsnips, peeled and cut into two inch pieces, larger pieces halved length wise
  • four skinny carrots, peeled and cut into two inch pieces, larger pieces halved length wise
  • one bunch of baby vidalias (about three), bulbs halved and green parts cut into three inch pieces (if you can’t find baby vidalias, substitute with a regular sweet onion and a bunch of green onions)
  • 1 heaping tsp each of dried herbs such as thyme, rosemary, sage, basil and marjoram (use fresh if you have them – just be sure and keep it diverse!)
  • zest and juice of one lemon (use a meyer if you have it)
  • a couple tbsp of butter, melted (omit if you’re feeling skinny)
  • three to four tablespoons extra virgin olive oil, plus more for drizzling
  • generous splash of balsamic vinegar
  • generous tsp of kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper, plus more to taste
  1. mix herbs, salt and pepper, lemon zest, lemon juice, melted butter and olive oil in a small bowl – the mixture should think but not pasty – easily pourable
  2. place all chopped veggies and chicken breast(s) in a large, glass baking dish or similar
  3. gently separate the skin from the chicken breast, carefully cutting so as not to detach skin from breast, and generously rub some of the herb mixture all over the chicken (make sure to rub plenty under the skin)
  4. pour the rest of the lemony, herby sauce all over the veggies and toss
  5. generously drizzle more extra virgin olive oil over the entire dish and season again with a little more salt and pepper
  6. place uncovered in a 500 degree oven on the very top rack and roast for 20 minutes
  7. remove from oven and splash some balsamic vinegar on the vegetables only
  8. return to oven and roast for 10 minutes more

Serve with all of the pan juices poured over the chicken and vegetables, and also with some crusty bread to soak up the amazing juices.

Be sure and roast with the skin on, even if you don’t plan to eat it.  This will help to keep the chicken moist and flavorful and cannot be omitted. 

If you have a little extra time, why not do a quick salt water brine for your chicken breast a few hours before cooking?

Read Full Post »

Lately, a lot of people have asked me to write them a weekly menu and corresponding grocery list.  Unfortunately, I haven’t had the time to do this (or write the post on my latest dining experiences in Texas, my first post on “beauty,” starring Ella and Ava, or the post I’ve been planning on my favorite market…).  My insane schedule does not line up with my desire for slow living!  I suppose the next best thing is to post what we are eating for dinner tonight…something simple, healthy and supremely delicious for a weeknight dinner. 

As usual, I don’t recall where this recipe came from – as always, I’m sure I have made a few modifications.  The recipe is still scribbled in one of my “food” notebooks, but now the contents reside in my head.  While the ingredient list may seem bizarre or unappealing, do not be deterred.  These flavors and spices come together beautifully for a moist and delicious dish.  I’m sure that the recipe is to serve four, but I still make all of the extra sauce and topping for two.  I love EXTRA flavor! 

When I’m preparing this for two, I split one chicken breast between us and bake in a loaf pan; this way all of the juices don’t disappear.  I’m sure this would be very tasty served over couscous or quinoa, but I just pair it with some roasted carrots.  I have served this many times for guests in my home; it is a hit every time. 

garlic lime chicken and olives

  • 1 lb boneless chicken breast halves (or less if you’re like me and split one chicken breast for two – skinny AND economical)
  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • 2 to 3 cloves of garlic, chopped
  • fresh juice of one lime
  • 1 tbsp of molasses (not black strap – don’t skip this step – so tasty!)
  • 2 tsp worsteshire sauce
  • 1/2 tsp of cumin (or more if you really love this flavor)
  • 1 heaping tsp of dried oregano
  • kosher salt and black pepper, to taste (at least 1/2 tsp of each)
  • 1/2 cup of sliced, pitted black olives (I alternate between kalamata and plain black olives)
  1. coat a roasting pan or baking dish (or loaf pan for a small group) with oil or cooking spray
  2. combine all ingredients, except for olives in a bowl
  3. stir and add chicken
  4. pour the olives over and around chicken
  5. roast at 400 degrees for 30 to 35 minutes

roasted carrots

  • carrots, peeled and cut into 2 inch chunks (amount of carrots depending on how many people you’re serving)
  • extra virgin olive oil
  • kosher salt and black pepper
  • thyme or rosemary (dried or fresh)
  • red wine vinegar or balsamic vinegar
  1. add your carrots to a baking dish and toss with a generous amount of olive oil, a few splashes of vinegar, and a generous sprinkle of herbs, salt and pepper
  2. roast, tightly covered in foil at 400 degrees for 25 minutes
  3. remove the foil and roast for 10 minutes more

note: I use balsamic vinegar paired with rosemary and red wine vinegar paired with thyme

Read Full Post »

Wow.  I have been traveling so it has been a while since I have posted.  Thanks to all who have continued to visit the blog!  I have so many things that I would like to share in depth, but in the spirit of something delicious on a busy evening, I will post a very tasty meal that I prepare frequently at home.  The avocados are ripe and beautiful right now at the market.  My grandma and grandpa had an ancient avocado tree in their backyard in California.  It was so lovely to walk outside and pluck beautiful fruit right from the tree. 

My pretend Mexican dinner is so simple that it seems almost silly to share it, but I know how many of you avoid the kitchen.  🙂  No excuses with this one.  This recipe is very light and healthy; the flavors are assertive and delicious.  All recipes below serve 2.

Please fix this for dinner and let me know what you think!

spicy chicken with cool avocado

  • chicken breast cut in half – each half pounded to a little less than an inch thick
  • some chili powder
  • some cayenne pepper (less if you don’t like heat)
  • kosher salt
  • ½ a red onion, diced
  • lime
  • avocado, diced
  • canola oil, for pan
  1. dice the red onion and mix it with the lime juice in a little bowl – set aside
  2. rub your chicken generously with a mixture of chili powder, cayenne pepper (use depending on heat preference) and some salt
  3. heat some canola or olive oil over medium head, and cook the chicken 3-4 minutes per side until done
  4. while chicken is cooking, dice the avocado and mix it into the onion and lime mix
  5. top chicken with the lime, onions and avocado – SO GOOD

black beans 

  • one can of black beans, rinsed (organic preferred)
  • a couple of garlic cloves, chopped
  • a pinch of chili powder
  • kosher salt and ground pepper
  • lime
  • green onion (if you have it)
  • about ½ cup of water
  • canola or olive oil for the pan
  1. heat some oil over medium in a small saucepan, and add the white portion of the green onion and the garlic, cooking for about 45 seconds to a minute 
  2. add the beans and stir, adding salt, pepper and a pinch of chili powder
  3. turn heat up to medium high and add a little bit of water
  4. continue to add water and stir occasionally for about 5 minutes, or until beans begin to take on a somewhat “refried” look, adding water as needed so that beans don’t burn
  5. give a generous squeeze of lime and serve

corn, elotes locos style

 

This corn is my white girl, at home interpretation of Mexican street food that I used to frequently eat in Dallas.  In Texas they call it “elotes locos,” or “crazy corn.”  Traditionally, corn is cut off of the cob and into a cup, topped with a mayonnaise/sour cream mixture, lime juice, hot sauce, and cheese (dry and crumbly – maybe cotija).  Don’t knock it until you’ve tried it.  It is OUTSTANDING.  In California, the tradition is similar, with the corn eaten on the cob, slathered with mayonnaise, hot sauce, cheese and lime.  I prefer it in the cup, as you can mix all of the creamy flavors together. 

 

While I may be missing some authenticity here, I can mimic the flavors somewhat with the staples I keep at home. 

  • frozen corn or fresh cut off the cob (or canned, if you must)
  • heaping tablespoon of mayonnaise, depending on the amount of corn (no dressing style mayo!)
  • a tsp or so of chili powder
  • lime
  • kosher salt and ground pepper
  • a dash of hot sauce (I prefer Sriracha)
  • optional: a light sprinkle of cotija cheese if you have it, or, dare I say it (!!??), canned parmesan
  1. heat corn in a little saucepan with a tiny bit of water over medium high
  2. once it is cooked through (after about 5 minutes), stir in mayo, lime, chili powder, a squirt of hot sauce, salt and pepper and mix together
  3. top with a little cheese 

 

 

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »